Category: Living in the Image of God

Christ Teaches Appreciation—Man Healed of Leprosy

Living in the Image of God M02S11

Interactions with a man healed from leprosy convey a message that God expects a recipient of favor (benefit provided by others) to appreciate the favor, appreciate the benefactor, and appreciate God for empowering the benefactor. Further, he expects the recipient to show appreciation by giving testimony. Also, his expectation of a favor recipient is the same even for those that could claim the favor as an entitlement. The man was one of ten healed in the event but he alone returned to give thanks. Christ criticized the nine but acknowledged the one and confirmed his faith had healed him.

Christ Teaches Appreciation—Man Healed of Leprosy 7:56

We discuss Christ interactions with a man healed of leprosy to understand that God expects appreciation from every recipient of favor (i.e., benefit provided by others) and expects the recipient to show appreciation by giving testimony. Even if the favor is done to fulfill an entitlement, God expects appreciation and testimony from the recipient. As we discuss previously in Understanding Appreciation, appreciation means thankful recognition of benefits received, the human provider of the benefits, and God that empowers the provider. Testimony regarding appreciation provides opportunity to share the information with others and inspire them (especially the benefactor) to do more likewise.

The man was one of a group of ten men that Christ healed from leprosy during the event. However, only the one man (a foreigner) returned to give thanks. The other nine did not return. Jesus criticized the nine for failing to return to show appreciation, notwithstanding they could claim to be entitled to the favor because they were Jews from Israel. We learn from his criticism that their response differs from what God expects of a favor recipient. In contrast, his interactions with the one man that returned convey a message that appreciation and testimony regarding appreciation are important to God.

Appreciation pleases God. He wants every recipient of favor to appreciate the favor, appreciate the benefactor, and appreciate God for empowering the benefactor. Furthermore, he wants the recipient to show appreciation by giving testimony. Also, his expectation of a favor recipient is the same even for those that could claim the favor as an entitlement.

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Understanding Appreciation

Living in the Image of God M02S10

Appreciation means thankful recognition of benefits received, the human provider of the benefits, and God that empowers the provider—a three-step interaction that begins with the benefits, continues through the benefactor, and on to God. Appreciation occurs in the heart and seeks outward expression through testimony, thereby inspiring others to do more likewise; motivates hunger and thirst for righteousness and, thus, initiates the long-term benefits of human service; and breeds humility and happiness. Appreciate the intrinsic value of a person as God’s representative in human interactions and you will be happy you do.

Understanding Appreciation 9:51

This bible study discusses the meaning of appreciation, starting with the dictionary definition and expanding on it to understand more. We discuss appreciation as a three-step interaction that begins with thankful recognition of benefits received, continues through the benefactor, and on to God. We note that all the steps and their sequence are important for appreciation to be effective and impactful. We discuss the value of testimony for expressing and sharing appreciation and note that the beneficiary testimony regarding appreciation can inspire the benefactor and others to do more likewise. Let a person know their good deed is appreciated and they are more likely to do more for you and others.

Also, as we discuss in a previous study under Christ Teaches Appreciation—Woman with Persistent Bleeding, Christ teaches appreciation by creating opportunity for public testimony or directing the beneficiary to go and testify publicly. Further, to discuss the value of appreciation, we note that appreciation motivates hunger and thirst for righteousness and, by doing so, initiates the long-term benefits of human service. Also, we note that appreciation breeds humility and humility breeds appreciation. Similarly, appreciation breeds happiness and happiness breeds appreciation.

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Christ Teaches Appreciation—Woman with Persistent Bleeding

Living in the Image of God M02S09

Interactions with woman healed of persistent bleeding indicate testimony and appreciation are important to God as opportunities to initiate long-term benefits to an increasing population. The woman was healed privately by touching Jesus and could have gone home without interacting with the public if healing her was the only important outcome. However, Jesus stopped activities until she testified publicly and showed appreciation. Her appreciation and testimony were important for motivating her and others to hunger and thirst for righteousness, thus initiating benefits of the healing that potentially could reach countless others.

Christ Teaches Appreciation—Woman with Persistent Bleeding 8:15

The bible provides two events from which we can discern Christ teaching on appreciation. In each event, his teaching on appreciation is conveyed through interactions with a healing recipient. The current study focuses on his interactions with a woman healed from persistent bleeding. The woman was healed privately by touching Jesus. However, after the healing, he provided opportunity for her to testify and show appreciation publicly. After she testified and showed appreciation, he declared that she was healed and released her to go in peace.

The woman could have gone home in peace without interacting with the public after she was healed privately by touching Christ’s garment. However, there was more to her healing that Christ wanted her to share with every person.

We discuss the interactions to understand that her appreciation and public testimony were important for providing an opportunity to initiate the long-term benefits of her healing. As we discuss in a previous study under Call to Appreciation of Compassion, her appreciation would motivate her to be good to others that would, in turn, motivate yet others to do likewise. Furthermore, her public testimony would inspire others to hunger and thirst for righteousness. Thus, her appreciation and public testimony were an opportunity to initiate benefits of the healing that potentially could reach countless others over endless time.

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Call to Appreciation of Compassion

Living in the Image of God M02S08

When God calls a person to provide goods or service to benefit another, he also calls the other to appreciate the act of compassion. Appreciation initiates a process toward realizing the long-term benefits of human service by motivating a hunger to be good to others, sensitivity to others’ needs, and a disposition to accept and complete responsibility in a subsequent call to compassion. Thus, appreciation unlocks the long-term benefits of human service by empowering the receiver of an act of compassion to motivate self and others as the initiating link in a potentially infinite network of provider-receiver relationships.

Call to Appreciation of Compassion 9:48

A call to compassion invokes a complementary call to appreciation. That is, when God calls a person to provide for the needs of another, he also calls the other to appreciate the act of compassion. Thus, a call to compassion establishes a provider-receiver relationship and assigns responsibility to the candidate provider as well as the candidate receiver. Your responsibility as the candidate provider is to recognize the need, care about the needy, commit to doing what you can, and persevere in seeking to alleviate the need. The receiver responsibility is to appreciate the act of compassion. That is, receive the provided goods or service with appreciation.

Appreciation initiates a process toward realizing the long-term benefits of human service. An act of compassion provides a short-term benefit of addressing the immediate need of the beneficiary and, in addition, sows the seed for long-term benefits that are dependent on the receiver’s appreciation. By appreciating the act of compassion, the receiver is motivated to seek to be good to others and sensitive to their needs. As a result, he or she is motivated to accept and complete responsibility in a future call to compassion. By doing so, he or she motivates another that motivates yet another: in a potentially infinite network of provider-receiver relationships. Thus, appreciation motivates the receiver of human service to “go and do likewise” [Luke 10:37] toward fulfilling God’s purpose for the distribution of human service.

This bible study focuses on understanding the relationship between compassion and appreciation in fulfilling God’s purpose for provider-receiver relationships among people. Subsequent studies will discuss Christ teaching and other information in the bible to understand the role of appreciation in human interactions and relationships.

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Blessing Does Not Seek Perfection

Living in the Image of God M02S07

The invitation to earn blessing through human service is open to every person irrespective of sin or righteousness. A person can earn blessing despite existing promise of punishment. Also, a person can incur punishment despite existing promise of blessing. Thus, one does not need to be perfect to earn blessing. Blessing and punishment are parallel promises of God, may coexist for a person, and will be fulfilled separately by God’s schedule as if for different people, excepting the forgiveness of punishment through repentance.

Blessing Does Not Seek Perfection 8:45

This bible study seeks further understanding of God’s invitation to every person to earn blessing by providing goods or services to benefit others. The invitation is open to all, irrespective of existing sin or righteousness. Further, God will fulfill every promise of blessing according to his schedule, irrespective of any incurred punishment. Consistent with his promise in the 2nd commandment, a promise of blessing can coexist with a promise of punishment and will endure through offspring generations.

Blessing and punishment are parallel promises of God and may coexist. A person can earn blessing despite an existing promise of punishment. Also, a person can incur punishment despite an existing promise of blessing. That means a person does not need to be perfect in order to earn blessing. Each promise will be fulfilled separately according to God’s schedule as if for a different person.

We discuss the 2nd commandment to link its promise with the coexistence of blessing and punishment. Also, we discuss several examples from the ancestral lineage of Jesus to understand the fulfillment of parallel promises.

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Accumulation of Blessing

Living in the Image of God M02S06

God creates every person with opportunities to earn independent blessing by completing responsibilities as his representative in human interactions; based on conditional promise proclaimed in the Beatitudes and explained through parables. Additionally, a person can receive dependent blessing through prayers by others, inherit blessing from previous family generations, or be blessed in other ways as God chooses. Every blessing accumulates and will be fulfilled at its time. Furthermore, blessing and punishment can coexist as parallel promises of God and do not trade-off against each other.

Accumulation of Blessing 9:32

Every person will have opportunities to receive independent blessing based on God’s conditional promise, dependent blessing that God grants to a person in response to prayers by others, inherited blessing from previous family generations, or other blessing that God grants as he chooses.

Every blessing is a promise to be fulfilled at its time, for the person directly or through offspring generations (e.g., “but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments” [Exodus 20:6]). As we discuss previously under Parallel Promises—in David-Bathsheba Relationship, blessing and punishment can coexist as parallel promises of God. They do not trade-off against each other. Each will be fulfilled separately when God chooses. A person that previously earned blessing could incur punishment. Also, a person can earn blessing even with a promise of punishment hanging on him or her.

For example, the Moabites displeased God by presenting themselves as a source of temptation for alternative worship among descendants of Israel. Furthermore, they presented enmity when their prior relationships with Israel called on them to be friendly (see more under Enduring Blessing—Lessons from Israelite-Moabite Interactions). God frowned on their behavior and prohibited descendants of Israel from intermingling with Moabites. Yet he chose Ruth, a Moabite daughter, as a parental link in the lineage of the Messiah.

We discuss the various opportunities to earn and accumulate blessing. Also, we discuss an example from David to illustrate coexistence and fulfillment of blessing and punishment as parallel promises of God.

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Call to Compassion or Commercial Opportunity

Living in the Image of God M02S05

A person may provide goods or services free or for-fee to alleviate a need. Preferably free to respond to a call to compassion, or for-fee if necessary to sustain the goods or services. In all cases, including commercial enterprise, adhere to fair fee for service and fair value for goods. God blesses the provider in a call to compassion. However, one motivated by commercial expansion could earn rewards through potential profit and blessing dependent on others, but no independent blessing.

Call to Compassion or Commercial Opportunity 9:37

We discuss differences and similarities between a call to compassion and a call to a commercial opportunity. In a call to compassion, a person is directed to an opportunity to develop goods and services to benefit others. In contrast, a commercial opportunity alerts a person to develop goods and services for personal commercial benefit. The two types of opportunities at times differ only by a thin line. In fact, the human attributes for recognizing and understanding a call to compassion are essentially the same as the attributes for recognizing and understanding a commercial opportunity.

Understanding the opportunity determines whether to provide goods or services free or for-fee to address the need. In a call to compassion, the motivation to address the need is driven by care of the needy (i.e., hunger and thirst for righteousness). In contrast, the motivation to address the need in a commercial opportunity is driven by care of the provider’s commercial interest (i.e., hunger and thirst for commercial expansion). In either case, the provider is driven by care to link the recognition of a need to commitment to address the need and perseverance in seeking to alleviate the need. Thus, a person disposed to recognize and respond to a call to compassion also will be disposed to recognize and respond to a commercial opportunity.

In previous studies such as under Responsibility in Call to Compassion, we discuss guidance for recognizing and responding to a call to compassion. This bible study focuses on the guidance, principles, and examples for developing a commercial opportunity in a way consistent with Living in the Image of God.

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Sacrifice and Generosity in Compassion

Living in the Image of God M02S04

Compassion entails sacrifice and generosity. Sacrifice is the value of goods and service that a person denies self to alleviate another’s need. Generosity implies a person’s effort in compassion is voluntary, constrained only by his or her ability to address the need, and motivated only by a desire to convey God’s love and care to the needy.


This bible study seeks to expand our understanding of compassion through a discussion of the role of sacrifice and generosity in providing goods or service to alleviate another person’s suffering. Compassion entails sacrifice, which means that a person will deny himself or herself something of value in responding to alleviate the need of another. Furthermore, compassion entails generosity, which means that a person’s effort in a call to compassion has to be voluntary, constrained only by his or her ability to address the need, and motivated only by a desire to convey God’s love and care to the person in need.

We discuss an example from David and one from Ruth to understand the nature of sacrifice in compassion. Also, we discuss from Paul’s message to the Corinthians to understand the implications of generosity in compassion.

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Call to Compassion Example—Good Samaritan

Living in the Image of God M02S03

The parable of the Good Samaritan provides an example of a call to compassion and explains that such a call presents opportunity to recognize a neighbor and demonstrate love of neighbor: care about the neighbor in need, commit to providing goods or service to address the need, and persevere in seeking to alleviate the need. God uses such interactions to direct human service to points of need and fulfill his purpose for provider-receiver relationships among people.

Living in the Image of God Module 02 Session 03 (7:58)

The parable of the Good Samaritan explains potential human behavior in a call to compassion. Potential response to such a call could consist of outright refusal, thus declining the responsibilities; or accepting the call and completing the responsibilities. Furthermore, the parable uses the events of a call to compassion to define love, neighbor, and “love your neighbor” in the context of recognizing another person’s need and accepting and completing responsibility to alleviate the need. Also, the parable defines need and needy in relation to a call to compassion.

We discuss the parable of the Good Samaritan and the explanations of human behavior provided in the parable to further understand what God expects from a person he calls to provide goods or service to alleviate the need of another.

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Responsibility in Call to Compassion

Living in the Image of God M02S02

The parable of the Sheep and the Goats explains human responsibility in a Call to Compassion and describes God’s judgment regarding performance of the responsibility. He assigns every person to one of two categories based on completing or declining such responsibility. He judges favorably a person that completes and unfavorably those that decline. A person earns blessing for completion or incurs punishment for declining.

Living in the Image of God Module 02 Session 02 (9:36)

In a Call to Compassion, God directs a person’s attention to the need of others and expects the call recipient to recognize the need, care about the needy, commit to providing a solution, and persevere in seeking to alleviate the need. Christ provides formal teaching in two parables to explain what God expects from us in a Call to Compassion. The parable of The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30–35) uses an example to explain human behavior in a Call to Compassion. Furthermore, the parable of The Sheep and the Goats explains human responsibility in a Call to Compassion and describes God’s judgment regarding performance of the responsibility. God judges a person favorably for completing his or her responsibility in a call to compassion or unfavorably for declining.

We discuss the parable of the Sheep and the Goats in this bible study and the parable of the Good Samaritan in a future study to expand our understanding of human responsibilities in a call to compassion.

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